Category: Research

kv Kölnan, student housing competition, 2001

Posted by on October 25, 2001

Competition entry as part of ongoing development project on rational building of student housing. As a respons to the lack of accomodation for students especially, the proposal investigated the potential of prefabrication while retaining a high level of variation.

The proposal was developed within the practice of Scheiwiller Svensson, in collaboration with Staffan Ädelqvist and Ylva Gunterberg.

The competition was organised by Stiftelsen Stockholms Studenbostäder and the City of Stockholm.

Portals, Memory of the World Archive, 2000

Posted by on March 25, 2000

Diploma thesis at the KTH School of Architecture, 2000

The Memory of the World Register is the UNESCO program for achives and collections of global importance around the world. The program includes all types of documents independant of media; handwritten records and manuscripts, books, magazines, printed matter, sound recordings, images, electronic data etc. The main goal of the program is to provide for safekeeping and display of the collections on the list, while all objects remain in the custody of institutes and organisations that claim ownership.

A Memory of the World Archive would be a further development of the UNESCO program, this organisation could collect the physical material on the list in national facilities, connected to a global network of similar locations. These scattered physical nodes would form a global network, in which mediated environments would provide access to the complete collections in each node. Each node would have multiple purposes; to collect and preserve or restore copy and return copy or original to “owner”. National legislation and relations between nations would require different solutions in this matter.

the thesis
Portals, Memory of the World Archive, used this developed concept for an exploration of remediation between physical and digital space. The thesis deals with a proposed physical structure for the Swedish branch of the archive, located in Stockholm. Based on the estimation that this archive needs the potential for both expansion and contraction, and the notion of browsing as a physical journey, this structure uses a hyperlink strucure in that it’s a redundant organisation in which physical closeness not necessarily means direct access, and distanced parts can be easily reached.

This structure is composed by two distinct components. The continuous spaces provide 48 bundled spatial sequences, with a multitude of spatial conditions giving specific qualities in each point. These spaces are connected by the 34 portals, which act as junctions or vaults in the overall structure, including doors which easily transforms the topology of the organisation. The portals also operates as mediated nodes, giving visible access to nearby continuous spaces, as well as mediated remote access to the other nodes of the archive around the world. They are sometimes complex structures in themselves, with transparent mediated surfaces, which all can shift between states of complete transparence, responsive digital interfaces, or even moving information carriers that would guide the visitor through the physical organisation.

Location
The chosen site on Kungsholmen in Stockholm most importantly gave topographical aspects that allowed for both underground and above ground use. Drottningholmsvägen ends in Kronobergsparken, a very normal condition in the urban fabric of Stockholm, where major streets often ends in parks, rather than public buildings. Today however, the final approach to the park is occupied by the entrance to Kronobergshäktet, a major criminal detention facility, through a tunnel under the park. The park has furthermore a pendig permit for underground facilities, primarily for parking garages, which makes excavation possible.

These conditions, as well as the present notion of dislocation in the area of Fridhemsplan, a infrastructural node in this part of Stockholm, suggested the need for a public focal point, but also made it necessary to keep the interface to the building a minimum. The portals, vital components of the interior structure, therefor also gives a redundant number of entrypoints, often with the option of either passing completely through the structure, as well as entering it at multiple points. These entries are located around Drottningholmsvägen as well as in Kronobergsparken.

Representation
The complexity of the proposed structure demanded specialized modes of representation, both in the design process and in order to convey the quality of the navigation of the final proposal. The principles of the remediated hypermedia to physical organisation was developed in topological diagrams, which established the two components. A series of conceptual digital models explored possible configurations for important nodes in the network.

The structure in itself was set up mainly in the sections of the continuous spaces, in which different configurations allowed for the different spatial conditions, as well as provided space for the portals. The portals were studied individually in digital models, resulting in a number of typological models each with a set number of configurations turning them effectively into the vaults of the organisation.

The topological qualities of the organisation, providing complete information about access in a totally open configuration with all doors open, but limited information about specific settings and spatial qualities were assembled in the topological map. In order to follow possible spatial sequences a kinetic section was devised. By stepping this animated sequence back and forth, following the longitudinal movement through the continuous spaces, and the latidudinal and vertical movement through the portals.

tutor: Ulrika Karlsson
Examinating Professor: Jerker Lundeqvist, Projekteringsmetodik KTH

Special thanks to:
Amir Aman, Karin Arnberg, Johan Bohlin, Daniel Norell, Karin Stenqvist and Volvo Car Corporation

The thesis project was shown in the KTH Diploma show Bigga Grejer and the Ung Svensk Form travelling exhibition in 2000.

Displace, 1999

Posted by on December 25, 1999

An entry for the 1999 Stuttgart Campustage, a student competition for a pavilion on the roof of one of the University buildings in central Stuttgart.

The brief requested a temporary and transportable pavilion constructed as a “sky-deck” on the top of the University´s “Kollegiengebäude I”, the home of the department of architecture and urban planning. The pavilion should offer the possibility to house modern technologies used for a multimedia exhibition. The proposal focuses on issues of fabrication, site-specificity and spatial re-configurations. In order to expose and sequence the complete 1170 m2 free area of the roof/site, the pavilion was fragmented. The 70 m2 floor-area specified in the brief was displaced to a new artificial site, the Motherform, measuring 10 by 7 meters.In the extraction of surfaces from the Motherform, common curves made possible the assembly of parts taken in different areas. The surfaces could endlessly be extracted within the computer model, to be investigated for optimum characteristics regarding general shape, specific parts and spatial configurations within groups.

PARCEL development

The Motherform would be excavated out of the ground, the common curves being the vital parts requiring high precision. Its surface would be covered by a thin layer of concrete, with a smooth surface, for durability. The extracted surfaces are outlined and cast in the Motherform mould, in the construction of the components, or Vessels, that constitutes the pavilion. The inherent curvature of the Vessels would enable multiple use, for sitting, projection, shelter from wind and rain etc. Since the Motherform mould would be permanent, situated in the vicinity of the actual site, new Vessels could later be created with the aid of the computer model. In the combination with the integrated multimedia technology, a multitude of different situations could be created through the reconfiguration of Vessels. The inherent curvature of the Vessels would enable multiple use, for sitting, projection, shelter from wind and rain etc. Since the Motherform mould would be permanent, and situated in the vicinity of the actual site, new Vessels could later be created with the aid of the computer model. In the combination with the integrated multimedia technology, a multitude of different situations could be created through the reconfiguration of Vessels

Project team DISPLACE: Amir Aman, Daniel Norell and Jonas Runberger.

Terrain of Interference, Diagrammatic Practices, 1998 – 1999

Posted by on October 25, 1999

A project acting between urban and architectural scale, focused on the potential of diagrams as operative tools for process. A site in Stockholm was given as a platform for exploration dealing with analytical and projecting qualities of software. The generative projective model working through complex systems required a transformation between input and output, taking the validity of the process into question. This project originated as an attempt to explore ways of closing thegap between a so called virtual, that is ideal and highly potential, model and real values and meanings.

The redundancy of the site in its present state, a leftover in the urban fabric, was evaluated as highly potential. The project came to deal with turning a redundant, less accessible surface into a highly accessible redundant space, through a generated new urban structure acting on constructional, infrastructural and programmatical levels.


Original project outline:


A generative projective model working through complex systems always requires a transformation between input and output which might put the validity of the process into question. This project originated as an attempt to explore ways of closing the gap between a so called virtual, that is ideal and highly potential, model and real values and meanings.

The redundancy of the site in its present state, a leftover in the urban fabric,was evaluated as highly potential, the project came to deal with turning a redundant, less accessible surface into a highly accessible redundant space, through a generated new urban structure acting on constructional, infrastructural and programmatical levels.

This new urban model would manifest ideas about flexibility and interaction in programs through time… …bringing about new constellations of programs also affecting the overall infrastructure.

The first model, the constructional matrix, would work in cross section, according to the idea of a system which could keep its physical integrity while being deformed.

To create a distribution seperated from the constructional matrix´s site-transformations, a zoning matrix was defined. In an intensification of the rising tendencies of Vasastaden towards the west, the matrices transformed an horizontal distribution into a vertical one, progressing both above and below ground level, treating it as a plane of reference.

The zone matrix made to interact with the constructional matrix. One part of each zone was defined as physical, introducing the concept of the wallfloor. Functioning as a new ground level, changing and shifting into walls or sheltering roofs, a gredient with undetermined initial use.

By defining the wallfloors as public surfaces in most configurations, it would interact with the zones and create a infrastructural subsystem with redundant qualities. An animated voyage along one of the nodes of a wallfloor would show that the nodes are accessible at the most places no matter the obliqueness of the particular wallfloor. This tilt of the wallfloor would also provide vertical access at many points, as wallfloors would merge, as well as creating a wide range of spatial constellations. In intervalls nodes of two different wallfloors might link to create an enclosed passageway. In a longer timespan, programs would be expected to shift according to the regulations of the zones, the animated zones shown represent that shift.

The wallfloors would merge with the adjacent infrastruture at various points to make its complex system of navigation accessible. When programs would move within their particular zone due to need of expansion, new constellations, etc, they might be partly merged with other programs in other zones. The project thereby becomes a platform where any change to the better (or different) includes a risk of unexpected new qualities.

The superstructure or conglomerate of zones/wallfloors/construction forms a shifting 3D cityscape, a new site for many purposes, waiting for a program or control system that would distribute functions according to their parameters, or simply create a multitude of conditions, where swirling wallfloors would be the most prominent, but not only actor. Different zones might have different services, inherent values in their cathegory. The evershifting wallfloor creates resistances but also possibilities. Circulation is directed through gradient changes in obliqueness, a habitable circulation, transitions between a multitude of different micro ambiances where all are free to roam the redundant, in search for vertigo, multiplicity, solitude or whatever cravings that would need to be fulfilled.

Student project in collaboration with Uli Seidel, the Diagrammatic Practices studio, KTH School of Architecture, 1998-1999

tutors: Ulrika Karlsson and Marcelyn Gow
examinating professor: Jerer Lundeqvist

Dynamic Labyrinths, 1998

Posted by on November 25, 1998

A proposal exploring the potential of the Dynamic Labyrinth, a Situationist concept indicating the notion of being lost, while still finding your way. Developed in a course on subway systems, the project deals with a potential transport conduit between existing and planned subway stations at slussen in Stockholm.

Rather than dealing with a new station, the project explores a passage between the complex, multi-level facilities of the Slussen hub, and a new commuter station near Mariatorget.

The passages are set in the sides of a turning void, linking different levels at both end points. Frequently the passages shift side, passing the void through capsules spanning the void. The commuter would never experience the full space of the void, but glimpse it through a partly obstructed screen. The redundant number of passages allowed for different routes to the same destination.

By suggesting programmatic free-zone activities in the capsules, residing within the regional transportation system, the project prosed situaitons which would exist outside of the urban planning model.

KTH School of Architecture,1998
tutor: Weronika Ronnefalk
examinating professor: Staffan Henriksson
exhibited at the Museum of Architecture 1998

Dynamo, on the generation of Spaces, 1997 – 1998

Posted by on July 1, 1998

The reversal of design process, creating conditions without specific uses, and explorations that would suggest uses. A generation of spaces, focusing on exact methods and the conclusions thereof, to suggest a design methodology through an understanding of input and output. Exploring the gap between the virtual and the actual, theory and practice, concept and technology.

A series of projects culminated in a design-technical dissertation and a final project based on a brief for a circus school. The given site, an air right above Farringdon Station, London, and the potential of new circus using terrain as a play ground for acrobatics implemented a number of important concepts: recreated nature and the translation of context, the physical and virtual framework, as well as generative feedback. A physical structure carried programmatic containers defined as vessels, allowing a top-side accessible to the public, and a bottom-side accessible to acrobats with special skills.

student design project + dissertation, the Bartlett School of Architecture, 1997-1998
tutor: Tony Smart, Unit 1

Folder, art and cultural magazine, 1996

Posted by on October 25, 1996

Folder was established as an independent art and cultural magazine in 1996 in Gothenburg, Sweden. Each issue was administered by a different individual, but no overall editors existed. Folder had an edition of 90, which made it possible to include both copied and printed material, as well as originals. Each contribution was duplicated by its creator, who also was responsible for its contents. No censorship was practised. Three rules governed contributions:

- The material should have a lasting artistic value
- The contributor should turn the medium to the best use
- A given format was to be followed, unless the contribution had specifics of its own (such as a postcard, CD or a cassette). All issues ended up in A4 however. These regulations were open to interpretation.

co-founders: Fredrik Jönsson, Johannes Giottas, Jonas Runberger and Henrik Törner