Hypersketch 2, 2000

Posted by on October 25, 2000

Hyper:Sketch was an architectural research platform and design studio at the KTH School  of Architecture, looking into the potential spaces between physical built, and virtually mediated environments.

The second Hyper:sketch project was set as a 6 week summer course and discussed a new notion of neighbourhood:
Physical as well as digital proximity. Contextual thinking is extremely important for any design task, it becomes evermore important when there is more than one reality influencing the project development.

1:Site exploration
Teams formed different cells to work on 16 sites in the urban area of Stockholm.
The first task was to analyse the site, and to produce digital documentation that communicated the character, infrastructure or atmosphere of the site. One local spot in each area became the site for the design intervention.

2:Neighbourhood negotiation
The next task was to recognise the cell position in the information chain.
-Each cell received information from the previous cell
-Each cell produced inormation about their site
-Each cell passed this information on to the next cell
The linked cell where not given adjecent areas, as seen on the map.

3:Functional analysis
The challenge was to construct a local pavillion, a vessel of contextual information. The physical scale should be that of a pavillion or urban furniture.
Certain issues were emphasised:
-What kind of information do you receive.
-How does it affect your site, Do you project it, create a sound environment or create a haptic interface?
-How does the pavillion interact with the local physical context.
Does it activly aquire contextual information. Does it surpress information?
-How does it forward information?
The pavillion could fulfill various function: It could be a remote communication tool, interresting for touristic applications, business meetings, cultural exchange or contemplation.

KTH School of Architecture summer studio
Tutors: Tobi Schneidler and Jonas Runberger
www.hypersketch.com

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Hyper:Sketch was an architectural research platform and design studio at the KTH School  of Architecture, looking into the potential spaces between physical built, and virtually mediated environments.

The second Hyper:sketch project was set as a 6 week summer course and discussed a new notion of neighbourhood:
Physical as well as digital proximity. Contextual thinking is extremely important for any design task, it becomes evermore important when there is more than one reality influencing the project development.

1:Site exploration
Teams formed different cells to work on 16 sites in the urban area of Stockholm.
The first task was to analyse the site, and to produce digital documentation that communicated the character, infrastructure or atmosphere of the site. One local spot in each area became the site for the design intervention.

2:Neighbourhood negotiation
The next task was to recognise the cell position in the information chain.
-Each cell received information from the previous cell
-Each cell produced inormation about their site
-Each cell passed this information on to the next cell
The linked cell where not given adjecent areas, as seen on the map.

3:Functional analysis
The challenge was to construct a local pavillion, a vessel of contextual information. The physical scale should be that of a pavillion or urban furniture.
Certain issues were emphasised:
-What kind of information do you receive.
-How does it affect your site, Do you project it, create a sound environment or create a haptic interface?
-How does the pavillion interact with the local physical context.
Does it activly aquire contextual information. Does it surpress information?
-How does it forward information?
The pavillion could fulfill various function: It could be a remote communication tool, interresting for touristic applications, business meetings, cultural exchange or contemplation.

KTH School of Architecture summer studio
Tutors: Tobi Schneidler and Jonas Runberger
www.hypersketch.com